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Fire & Water - Cleanup & Restoration

Class of Water Intrusion

3/9/2017 (Permalink)

Water Damage Class of Water Intrusion Class 3 Water Damage

Class of Water intrusion

Restorers should estimate the amount of humidity control needed to begin the drying process. A component of the humidity control requirement is the Class of water.

The term “Class of water intrusion is a classification of the estimated evaporation load and is used when calculating the initial humidity control (e.g. dehumidification, ventilation). The classification is based on the approximate amount of wet surface area, and the permeance and porosity of the affected materials remaining within the drying environment at the time drying is initiated. Information needed to determine Class should be gathered during the inspection process. The Classes are divided into four separate descriptions, Class 1,2,3 and 4.

 

Class 1- (least amount of water absorption and evaporation load); Water intrusion where wet, porous materials (e.g., carpet gypsum board, fiber-filled insulation, concrete masonry unit (CMU), textiles) represent less than ­~5% of the combined floor, wall and ceiling surface area in the space; and where materials described as low evaporation materials (e.g., plaster wood, concrete, masonry) or low evaporation assemblies (e.g., multilayer wallboards, multilayer subfloors, gym floors or other complex built-up assemblies) have absorbed minimal moisture.

 

Class 2- (significant amount of water absorption and evaporation load): Water intrusion where wet porous materials (e.g., carpet gypsum board, fiber-fill insulation concrete masonry unit (CMU, textiles represent ~5% to ~40% of the combined floor, wall and ceiling surface area in the space; and where materials described as low evaporation materials (e.g., plaster wood, concrete, masonry) or low evaporation assemblies (e.g., multilayer wallboards, multilayer subfloors, gym floors or other complex built-up assemblies) have absorbed minimal moisture.

 

Class 3- (greatest amount of water absorption and evaporation load): Water intrusion where wet porous materials (e.g., carpet gypsum board, fiber-fill insulation concrete masonry unit (CMU, textiles represent more than ~40% of the combined floor, wall and ceiling surface area in the space; and where materials described as low evaporation materials (e.g., plaster wood, concrete, masonry) or low evaporation assemblies (e.g., multilayer wallboards, multilayer subfloors, gym floors or other complex built-up assemblies) have absorbed minimal moisture.

 

Class 4- (deeply held or bound water): Water intrusion that involves a significant amount of water absorption into low evaporation materials (e.g., plaster, wood, concrete, masonry) or low evaporation assemblies (e.g., multilayer wallboards, multilayer subfloors, gym floors or other complex built-up assemblies). Drying may require special methods, longer drying times or substantial water vapor pressure differentials.

 

Other Factors Necessary to Estimate Drying Capacity

Other factors can impact the drying environment. Restorers should understand and consider there factors when estimating the drying capacity needed to prevent additional damages and being the drying process.

These factors include:

  • Influence of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems;
  • Build out density of the affected area;
  • Building construction complexity; and
  • Influence of outdoor weather.

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